Category Archives: Culture

Stoke Climsland Free Concert


On Saturday 25th April, the Callington Singers will be giving a free concert in Stoke Climsland Church. The concert will incorporate lots of joyful music under the general theme of the coming of summer. The programme will include Vivaldi’s Magnificat, along with some madrigals, the Hallelujah Chorus and an original setting of the Jubilate, composed by our new Musical Director, Andrew Wilson. The Callington Singers has a long tradition of making music freely accessible to the community. It is our policy to strive, wherever possible, to give concerts completely free of charge. This is not always practical, as there are many expenses to cover, such as venue hire, publicity and the fees of hired musicians. The choir rely on a retiring collection after each concert to cover these costs. We are very pleased to be working again with Stoke Climsland Parish Church. The Callington Cluster (incorporating churches in Stoke Climsland, Linkinhorne, Callington and South Hill) have the admirable policy of hiring out these churches free of charge, which makes our job of providing free music very much easier.

The free venue and delightful surroundings are not the only reason we are pleased to be performing in Stoke Climsland church again. We also enjoy performing there as an unofficial honour to an important character from Stoke Climsland’s past, who strived as we do, to provide music in his community and who would be familiar with most of the music we are to perform on this occasion; namely Thomas Calvert, gentleman of Stoke Climsland. The impressive memorial to Thomas Calvert appears prominently in the foyer of Stoke Climsland Church: In Memory of Mr Thomas Calvert Late of this parish who in the year 1746 First introduced into this Church four part Psalmody and with Indefatigable Pains and perseverance not only encouraged but in a great measure supported it with great Reputation upwards of 30 years He Was an Honest Man a Kind Master a Sincere Friend And a good Christian He departed this life at Plymouth on June 3rd 1781 in the 71st year of his Age. Although described as being ‘of the parish of Stoke Climsland’, Thomas Calvert was born in Moor Monkton, just outside of York. He was the firstborn son of Joseph and Elizabeth Calvert (née Hunter) and was baptised on the 18th August 1710. How he came to be a pillar of the Stoke Climsland community is a complete mystery. He married a local girl, but had no children. He was employed as Coroner for Cornwall in 1756 and retired from this post in 1776. He spent his last months living in St. Germans (where he made his will) and he was buried in Stoke Climsland churchyard.

His contribution to village life is undeniable. Mr. Calvert’s promotion of four part psalmody singing reflects the growing popularity, at this period, of incorporating music into church services and we owe him a debt of gratitude for the continuing tradition of choral singing which is enjoyed in this country. The ‘Indefatigable Pains and Perseverance’ which are quoted on Thomas Calvert’s memorial stone are aptly illustrated here in a transcript of an extract from the Vestry minutes of Stoke Climsland. Any modern Musical Director will doubtless recognise the inherent challenges facing him. Vestry Minutes from 28th of November 1773: A Letter was read from Mr Thomas Calvert, setting forth the disappointments he has meet [sic] with in his frequent Attendance on the Singing owing to irregularity & Refractioness of many of the numbers, and Declaring that he wou’d not think of Attending many more unless the whole Body wou’d enter into an Obligation Consisting of Several Conditions which he propos’d for the better keeping up & bringing to perfec[ti]on & carrying on with Psalmody to the promotion of Religion and Harmony [in] the Performers; Observing at the same time however that the Parishioners who were the Singers had been at much trouble in Learning & many of them were put to Inconvenience by their Attendance & moreover that few or none has Books & others in general very bad; Proposing therefore as an Encouragement & Countenance to those who wou’d enter into & sign an Association to continue & practice the singing for three years, that the Parish at Large should contribute something towards purchasing proper Books, & defraying other Expenses, in which He, Mr Calvert wou’d also contribute & Mr & Mrs Call had also promis’d. The Members of the Vestry taking the premises with Consideration & being sensible of Mr Calverts Obliging Attendance & Trouble for many years, in promoting & assisting the singing & in doing many other Beneficial Acts to the Church, Do unanimously Agree, that the sum of Six Guineas out of the Church Rates be allow’d from Xmas 1773 to Xmas 1774 to be paid to Mr Calvert by the Churchwardens & laid out by him as he judges may best promote the good order, regularity & continuation of Psalmody, provided that the singers will all enter into such a Bond as he proposes, this contribution to be for one year only at this expiration of which the Parishioners will Continue or revoke it as they See it has Promoted, or Disappointed the End Propos’d.

We sincerely hope that Thomas Calvert would approve and enjoy this upcoming concert, as we also hope you will. Stoke Climsland church will shortly undergo a major refurbishment of the church roof, which we hope will go forward without a hitch. Come and help us raise the roof before it is repaired by joining us for a splendid evening of music on 25th April at 7pm.

“And Some Came Home” – support project now


Esme and Seth Blaze show their support for Callington Town Band’s Community project, ‘And Some Came Home’, when they put their tokens in the Town Band ‘Bags of Help’ slot at Callington Tesco.  With just a week or so to go they are hoping that the Town Band, in which both their parents play, will be a worthy winner.

And remember that you can support the project in other ways by coming along to the first Singing Workshop in Callington Town Hall at 10am on July 21st or by volunteering to act.  Contact Shirley Morse (01579 360336 or shirleyamorse@gmail.com) for more information.

This is the first event in the re-running of ‘And Some Came Home’, the successful community commemoration of WW1 that was first performed in 2014.

With a cast of local singers, actors and musicians the 2018 performances will take place in the Town Hall on October 26th and 27th with free admission.

If you can’t make it to the first session and would like to take part in any capacity then please contact Shirley Morse now on 01579 350336 or shirleyamorse@gmail.com

St. Nicholas, Sinterklaas, Mikolaj, Santa


St. Nicholas’ day is on the 6th December, but in The Netherlands and Poland, the major celebrations are held on the 5th December. Sinterklaas or Santa Claus visits and in Poland, Mikolaj, the Polish Santa, visits children and brings small gifts to reward them for good behaviour, or to remind them not to be naughty he’ll leave a twig, maybe with a present. Advent is the start of Christmas in Poland, when people try to be peaceful and reflect and try not to have excess of anything, some giving up their favorite foods or drinks. Children take part in “Jasełka” (Nativity Plays). The smell of tangerines in schools or workplaces is widely thought to mean that Christmas time is about to start!

Christmas Eve known as Wigilia (pronounced vee-GHEE-lee-uh) is a very important and busy day, even though it’s not a holiday. The house is cleaned and the Christmas tree decorated. The main Christmas meal is eaten in the evening and is called “Kolacja wigilijna” (Christmas Eve supper). It’s traditional that no food is eaten until the first star is seen in the sky!

On the table there are 12 dishes, meant to give you good luck for the next 12 months. The meal is traditionally meat free. For catholics the 12 dishes symbolize Jesus’ 12 disciples. Some people in central Poland say that at midnight the animals can talk.

One of the most important dishes is “barszcz” (beetroot soup) eaten with “uszka” (little dumplings with mushrooms) or “krokiety” (pancakes with mushrooms or/and cabbage, in breadcrumbs).

Carp is the main dish of the meal. The fish itself is traditionally bought a few days earlier alive. The carp’s scales are said to bring luck and fortune and kept.

“Bigos” is a dish which can be eaten either hot or cold. It’s made of cabbage, bacon, sometimes dried plums – so it is saved for Christmas day or the 26th as it has meat in it. It is made about a week or so before Christmas Eve, because with each day it gets better.

Herrings are very popular and served in several ways. In most houses there is “kompot z suszu” a drink made by boiling dried fruits and fresh apples.

Presents aren’t to be opened until after the meal and after carols are sung, sometimes prolonged to tease the children. Christmas Eve finishes by going to Church for a Midnight Mass service.

In Polish Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Wesołych Świąt’.

Polish Children often get dressed up and go carol singing on Epiphany, January 6th.

In the Netherlands it all starts on the second Saturday of November when Sinterklaas and his servants (elves) called ‘Zwarte Pieten’ (‘Black Peters’) travel to a city or town. Dutch tradition says that St. Nicholas lives in Madrid, Spain and every year he chooses a different harbour to arrive in Holland, so as many children as possible get a chance to see him.

Church bells ring in celebration, Sinterklaas, dressed in red robes, leads a procession through the town, riding a white horse. Every town in The Netherlands has a few Sinterklaas helpers, dressed the same as Sinterklaas who help give out the presents.

Children are told that the Zwarte Pieten keep a record of all the things they have done in the past year in a big book. Good children will get presents from Sinterklaas, but bad children will be put in a sack and the Zwarte Pieten take them to Spain for a year to teach them how to behave! Continue reading

Raising Funds for St Sampson’s


St Sampson’s Church are contacting architects to draw up plans for our renovations and improvements to the building and we are also looking at many funding options.

Did you know that whenever you buy anything online – from your weekly shop to your annual holiday – you could be collecting free donations for St Sampson’s Church, South Hill?

There are over 3,000 shops and sites on board ready to make a donation, including Amazon, John Lewis, Aviva, the trainline and Tesco – it doesn’t cost you a penny extra

It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3… 

1. Head to https://www.easyfundraising.org.uk/causes/stsampsonschurch/ and join for free.

2. Every time you shop online, go to easyfundraising first to find the site you want and start shopping.

3. After you’ve checked out, that retailer will make a donation to your good cause for no extra cost whatsoever.

There are no catches or hidden charges and St Sampson’s Church, South Hill, Cornwall will be really grateful for your donations to help with the ongoing upkeep of this beautiful church.

Thank you for your support.

 

A Newsletter produced by and for the Parish of South Hill


Welcome to the South Hill Connection Newsletter!

Newsletter number 81, September 2020

Your newsletter with news, events, information, silly stuff, important stuff.  Keep sending your items, photos, history, ANYTHING of interest email editor@south-hill.co.uk. Thank You.

In this edition of the South Hill Connection we have :

·        Horticultural Show Results 

·        New ADVERTISERS

·        News on Recycling

·        Important stuff 

·        Fun stuff

Newsletter full version – click here…  and Condensed version here

Continue reading

Bodmin Moor International Dark Sky Park


Our unique dark rural setting on the fringe of Bodmin Moor has an opportunity to make an historic mark, which will enhance our lifestyle, protect our community and last for generations to come.

Cornwall Council and Caradon Observatory have proposed a bid to have Bodmin Moor recognised as a Gold standard International Dark Sky Park, arguably comparable to World Heritage Site status. The Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Unit and the Campaign to Protect Rural England support the proposal and with public backing, the council will submit the decision this summer.

Edwina Hannaford, Cornwall Council’s portfolio holder for planning, said: “I’m thrilled with this initiative. It mixes the ageless fascination and romance of the stars with real science and learning, and it has tangible opportunities for tourism too.

“Recent observatory data shows that the quality of the night sky over Bodmin Moor is amongst the best in the world. Achieving recognition of this through an International Dark Sky Park designation would help protect the night sky from light pollution and bring other benefits, including providing a focus for awareness and learning about the stars and solar systems, a further draw for visitors to the area and a starrier sky for local residents.”

International Dark Sky Parks must be a protected landscape, and Bodmin Moor is already known as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Continue reading

Kelliwik Music Festival


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Kelliwik Festival entertained us with a massive variety of Music, and All acts came FREE of Charge over the packed 3 days.

Performing in the craft & bar tents & main marquee an amazing feat by the organisers

Some of the crafters will be joining us on the Show Fun Day ! Jewellery, Art, Nappy cakes, cards, prints, wood work. There’s going to be quite a mix including Elaine & Cat Ede promoting the virtues of Forever Aloe Vera products. 07775 409 493

The Grand Final Hurrahkelliwik 008

Come and join the Band!

With a busy summer season of engagements drawing to a close, Callington Town Band and its Training Band invite new members to ‘Come and Join Us!’

Whether you are a learner or returning after a break or an experienced player we would welcome players of all abilities.  Instruments can be provided, on loan, free of charge to members.  Cornet players are particularly needed.

Visit our website, www.callingtontownband.com, phone Band Secretary, Shirley Morse (01579 350336) or speak to the players whenever you see them at engagements.  Get it straight from the horse’s mouth!