Category Archives: General Interest

Kit Hillbillies Rock Calstock


On Friday March 4th 2022, the amazing Kit Hillbillies played at Calstock Arts, at the Old Chapel, Calstock.

A great time was had by all, and a generous collection for the UK Red Cross Ukraine appeal raised £1500.


How to describe the Kit Hillbillies?

Old-timey, good-timey bluegrass!
With rousing vocal harmonies that smuggle in occasional quirky local references.

Instrumental tasting notes: Banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar. Irresistibly tappy on the toes, with a crisp percussive finish.

Think Betty Stogs, rather than Harvey’s Bristol Cream!

In their words: “We throw in some original bluesy songs with many a knowing nod to the backwoods and badlands of Devon & Cornwall. These *usually* avoid causing offence (happily people don’t always listen to the words!). We always do some 20thC classics by the likes of Johnny Cash & Steve Earle. And like Hayseed Dixie we throw in songs by Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Clash and even Radiohead – all delivered in good-time string band style. In short, it’s the makings of a rousing, stomping night of tunes.”

Pooh Sticks!


SHARE Hydro Feasibility Update, March 2022

Regular readers will remember earlier articles describing our initial investigations into the potential of water turbines. For the benefit of newer readers, those investigations involved installing a measurement weir structure, however this unfortunately came to a premature end when the Environment Agency took an active interest. Temporary measurement weirs are permitted, however in this instance the EA considered that expensive licences would be needed, and that special provisions would have to be put in place to enable eels and migrating fish to move upstream unhindered.  To our knowledge, eels and migrating fish haven’t been seen in this tributary of the Lynher in living memory, however the possibility that Samantha Salmon might take a wrong turn and find her path obstructed was enough to keep the good folk at the EA awake at night. Also, the required licences were unaffordable, and so the measurement weir had to go. Continue reading

Emergency Information and Links


What can we learn from Storm Eunice? If there is a Weather Warning:

Inside

  • Fully charge your computers, phones etc. ahead of time. Remember you can use your car to charge these, make sure you have the correct adaptors.
  • Fill a flask.
  • If your water is pumped, ensure you have sufficient stored water.
  • Buy torches, candles, matches and batteries in advance and get them out.
  • If you expect a power cut (storm / high winds) or if there is lightning in the area, turn off your PC and other delicate electrical items because a power surge can damage them.
  • Switch off your appliances, so they do not start working in the event you’re out when the power comes back on.
  • If the power goes off, try to limit opening the freezer and fridge.  
  • If the power goes off, keep warm by wrapping up in extra layers of clothes, blankets, duvets etc.
  • Please stay safe, do not put yourself or others at risk by using unsafe forms of heat e.g. barbeques and patio gas stoves indoors.
  • Have emergency numbers to hand.  
  • Western Power have posted details to affected homes outlining the process for automatic compensation, without any requirement to make individual claims.
    • Storm Eunice was a category 2 storm so:
      • After the first 48 hours without power you are eligible for £70 compensation.
      • There will then be another £70 for every further 12 hours.
      • All eligible customers will receive a letter and a compensation payment based on the eligibility criteria set by Ofgem.
      • You should receive that within ten working days.

Western Power Distribution – Storm Eunice: Ofgem’s Guaranteed Standards Compensation Scheme

Outside

  • Store and secure outside items so they do not become a danger to you or to others.
  • Take care of your pets, keep indoors if possible. If shutting chickens in etc., ensure they have ventilation, food and water.  
  • Be flood aware and find out how to prepare. If your home starts to flood call the Environment Agency on 0345 988 1188 (24 hour).
  • Collect your medications and essential supplies beforehand so you don’t need to travel.
  • Avoid travel, unless absolutely necessary.
  • If you do have to make a journey be prepared:
    • Take extreme care.
    • Take coat, sturdy boots and warm clothes in case you break down or have to leave your vehicle.
    • Expect road closures and disruption due to fallen trees and debris.
    • Expect road damage and hedges to be collapsed.
    • Expect falling tiles / branches / trees and flying debris.
    • Expect difficult driving conditions e.g. strong winds and driving rain.
  • Rail and bus services were disrupted, always check before leaving home.
  • Please stay safe and do not do anything to put yourself or others at risk.

Communication

  • If you receive The CONNECTION newsletter we can send updates by email, if you are not signed upsend your email to editor@south-hill.co.uk
  • Facebook, Next Door, Twitter etc.
  • Contact your neighbours:
    • To establish whether your issue is an isolated case.
    • To look out for and check on vulnerable neighbours.
  • Postal and rubbish collection services were disrupted. Please safely store your rubbish for next collection.
  • If you find yourself in a situation where you believe you are in danger, call 999.
  • Please contact NHS 111 first, unless you have a serious or life-threatening injury or illness.
  • Cornwall Council’s emergency line is: 01872 323752 Offers support and advice and passes specific needs on to other agencies or departments.
  • Cornwall’s 24/7 NHS Mental Health support line 0800 038 5300 FREE 24 hour, if you’re worried about your own or someone else’s mental health..
  • Report a fallen tree blocking a road or causing danger. Inform the owner, one of our parish councilors or call Cornwall Council on 0300 1234 222 (24 hour), or  www.cornwall.gov.uk/report-something/
  • If the tree has pulled down / damaged cables / poles these could be live. Do NOT touch them. Contact Western Power Distribution.

Call 105 or 0800 678 3105 105, www.westernpower.co.uk, info@westernpower.co.uk.

  • Home flooding – call the Environment Agency on 0345 988 1188 (24 hr). Report flooding to the Environment Agency Incident hotline 0800 80 70 60 (24hr).

Please email and let us know if we missed anything, your thoughts, your suggestions, any other comments or concerns to editor@south-hill.co.uk.

Thank You. Stay Safe.

A Newsletter produced by and for the Parish of South Hill


Latest Newsletter!

Read all about it!

Newsletter number 102, July 2022

In this 102nd edition of the South Hill Connection:

  • The return of the Harvest Supper
  • Church Matters
  • Parish Council Minutes
  • Piecemakers Open Day
  • Jubilee Celebration recap
  • Orchard Grand Opening
  • Latest from the St Sampson’s, SHARE, Recycling for Charity & Parish Council

And much more…

Next Edition:  If you would  like to make a contribution, please email editor@south-hill.co.uk or call THE NEWS DESK. Ali 07305 044049 or Areina 07788 300025.

Newsletter full version – click here…  and Condensed version here (with no adverts and fewer pictures, for slow internet connections!)

Please tell us what you think of it by contacting editor@south-hill.co.uk

Archived newsletters (all of them!)
can be found in our public Google Drive folder – here…

Some news articles are also posted here as a blog on our News page. The latest will always be at the top. If you want to search for news articles you can do so using the Search box on the right, or by selecting a News Category from the drop-down list.

Business advertisers can be found on our Local Business pageSave

SHARE – Spotlight on Recycling


Thank you

First of all, we’d like to thank our Cornwall Councillor Sharon Daw for a recent grant from her “Community Chest” fund.  We’re having hi-visibility vests made, with our logo on the back, for volunteers.  This will help reduce any risk to our regular volunteers collecting recycling (see below) in various locations; also planting trees, and helping with the firewood project.

SHARE Recycling for Charity project

The project continues to grow, thanks to our enthusiastic volunteers that help monitor collection bins, pick up, sort into boxes and send the vast amount of items to Terracycle every month. By saving these otherwise hard to recycle items from being incinerated, we are generating funds for charities.

Continue reading

Looking backwards, looking forwards


The New Year is typically the time when we reflect on the past and then look forward to the coming year in the hope that it will be better.  The desire to have something to hope for that will improve our life is strong. The month of January gets its name from the Roman god Janus who has one face looking back and the others looking forwards. He is the god of gates and transitions.

Often, we can’t move forwards unless we have looked back, retraced our steps and asked some serious reflective questions such as: Is there a pattern in my behaviour and relationships that keeps repeating itself? Is there something I need to acknowledge and take responsibility for? Do I recognise my reactions could have been different? The key is to learn from the past and not just glance at it, so we don’t get stuck in the same old patterns of behaviour. If we do this well, we will grow and develop ways and means of working better with others; as well as being authentic to ourselves.

Continue reading

SHARE Hydro – update


By now, we had expected to have a live website, updated continuously, showing the potential of the Lansugle stream to provide a small scale generation scheme .

Back in 2020, SHARE volunteers had already completed the metalwork for the measurement weir and reinforced the banks along the short stretch of the stream that suffered flooding in November 2019’s torrent. We completed putting in place a 65mm (2 ½ inch) high weir ready to use the electronics to measure the fall over it. We’d checked in the Environment Agency’s guidance that a measurement weir didn’t need any additional permission. But for reasons unknown to us the Environment Agency took an interest in our work, and sent a fisheries expert to take a close look, and we were then advised that changing the flow from turbulent to smooth along the weir structure (just three feet long) would contravene the Salmon and Freshwater Fisheries Act. It turns out that we would need at least three extra items: a salmon ladder, an eel pass and a supplementary licence, the application fee for which is an additional £1500!

The impact of the Environment Agency intervention was that the metal weir structure had to be removed. This was done quickly and the site completely restored to the state that it has been in for the past 50 years. The purpose of the metal weir was to straighten and smooth the water, resulting in “laminar flow” over a clean edge. This, in conjunction with a water depth measurement system, would have enabled flow over the weir to be very easily calculated, with little manual intervention. It would in fact have been possible to monitor the flow closely over a 12 months period, in a fully automated way. Occasional site visits would have been necessary to ensure that the metal channel and weir remained clear of obstructions such as branches and other debris.

But we’re determined to complete what we originally set out to do; it’s just that we had to find a method that meets these additional regulations. We still want to characterise the catchment area and stream flow, throughout the year – even on a weekly basis. We also want to be able to assess the power generation potential of small streams such as this one, and so put ourselves in a better position to be able to subjectively judge alternative potential power generation sites. Consequently, we have purchased a small water turbine flow meter and started to measure flow with this equipment on a regular basis. The site has concrete piers that were used in the distant past to provide the greater head of water needed to drive a water pump. These piers provide an area that constrains the flow and makes it relatively easy to carry out a matrix of flow speed measurements. Although it is still early days, we are gathering some interesting results.

We have already seen that flow can vary widely in a short space of time. In the dry weeks of November, the flow would only have been sufficient to generate around 1kW of electricity. In early December, following heavy rain, 6kW electricity generation would have been possible. 6kW round the clock, entirely independent of wind or sunshine would be a very valuable local generation capacity – equivalent to the average energy used to power around 15 homes.