Category Archives: People

Parish war exhibition


Exhibition in St Sampson’s church, to show how the two world wars, and all the other wars of the last century, affected the families of the people who have lived in South Hill Parish, during that time, or live here now.
This is not just about families who were living here during the wars, although obviously they have some interesting stories to tell, but also those parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts etc. of the families who live here today, and who may have been living hundreds of miles away.
We have some fascinating stuff, including details of a South Hill man who was awarded the Victoria Cross, but there must be much more we could include. Pictures, letters, diaries, photographs of medals, and newspaper clippings are ideal, but we would also like the stories of what happened on the ‘home front’.
Land girls, prisoners working on farms, home guard (Did we have our own Captain Mannering ?), ambulance drivers, evacuees, merchant navy, or anything about how our families were affected.  Does anyone still have a gas mask, or a ration book ?
Please let me know if you have anything.  We can help with printing and copying if it is too valuable to loan.
Geoff Clemerson, Anvil Cottage, 01579 362623 gcclemerson@gmail.com

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Ex-Callington school students


Dear Ex-Callington students,

We have a number of events coming up, one of which is very soon and one slightly further away in time. We are also keen for any of you who would like to to come in to talk to our students about what you do either in assemblies or with classes; departments are always very keen to tell our current students about what you are up to.

Recently we have had scientists, artists, train drivers and ship yard apprenticeships who used to attend the college coming in and telling us all about their lives and careers since leaving Callington. We are also, of course, basking in the reflected glory of alumnus Joff Oddie’s sucess with winning the Mercury Music Prize with his band Wolf Alice.

On Thursday 1st November we are holding an event for our current Year 11 students who are just about to consider their post-sixteen options. If you were able to attend and talk to our students that would be great. The idea is that small groups (6-10) of Year 11s will carousel around different employers/alumni and further education providers to find out what the future could hold for them. The event is due to run from 8.50am until 11.20. If you can’t make it in person but would like to be involved then there are some options:

1: Perhaps someone in the organisation/company that you work for could come along

2: Perhaps you could make a 30 second video about yourself/your work that we could show.

3: Perhaps your organisation has a promotional video that we could show on the day.

Looking further into the future we another calendered event on 14/02/2018 that I am calling ‘I Love My Job’ which will be aimed at the younger children at the college; again, you, your colleagues or your virtual presence would be great.

Thanks for taking the time to read this; you are an essential part of our college community and we are hugely proud of what you have achieved,

Let me know if you can help or if we can help you in any way,

Best wishes

Jonathon Plunkett

Alumni Officer Callington Community College callington@networks.futurefirst.org.uk

Church Matters


Church Matters

There are times when I’m intrigued by the lives of well-known personalities. So often they can be seen to be achieving so much in their lives, and yet at times there emerges the frailties that they can suffer in their more private moments. There can be no doubting the influence and success that they have, but we don’t often catch a glimpse of the inner person that may be quietly plagued with doubt and fear.

I recently came across a Guardian newspaper interview with Lisa Brennan-Jobs. I suspect that name will not be instantly recognisable, but Lisa is the daughter of Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple, the company that is now the largest in the world by market value (over 1 trillion dollars). He was in many senses a brilliant man – a visionary of how technology could be designed and produced to not only look and feel good, but effectively support new and effective ways of doing things. One well-known example was the launch of the iPhone back in 2007, a totally new approach to the mobile phone which changed the market completely. Since that time most mobile phone manufacturers try to out-do the latest iPhone with each release of a new product. Continue reading

Minefield


Minefield

How can a soldier deal with memories of war? What memories do they repress – and which do they cherish?

Three Argentine and three British veterans from both sides of the 1982 Falklands/Malvinas conflict came together for this remarkable show exploring the treacherous minefield of their memories, through theatre, film and live rock music.

MINEFIELD is an enthralling piece of documentary theatre by Argentinian actor and director Lola Arias – compassionate, cathartic and astonishingly moving. Performed to enormous acclaim in both Britain and Argentina and have taken the crew on tour to Paris, Frankfurt, Angers and Montpellier. The show takes you from the horrors of the battlefield to today’s uncertainties, with brutal honesty and startling humour. See more here

Cast: David Jackson, Lou Armour, Gabriel Sagastume, Ruben Otero, Sukrim Rai, Marcelo Vallejo

Dave Jackson lives in Trevigro, Congratulations on the success of Minefield and the wedding of your daughter in September. What an amazing time for you all.

Third Light


Third Light A play by local Linkinhorne resident and historian Simon Parker was at The Minack Theatre September 10 -14th.

Amongst the 13 soldier cast, is local lad Thomas Bariball from Polhilsa.

Imagine a Cornish village whose men all came home from the trenches. Imagine a war memorial honouring the living, not the dead. Imagine a place symbolising hope amid horror. Through immersive drama, live brass band and contemporary dance, Third Light tells the unique and moving story of Herodsfoot. A play based on the true story of the thirteen men of Herodsfoot, who went to serve in the First World War and all came home. Conceived and written by local Linkinhorne historian, directed by Nicola Rosewarne, choreographed by Ben Dunks, designed by Meier Williams, produced by Sarah Pym. Performed by an ensemble of professional and community actors and dancers, with music played live by St Pinnock Brass Band led by David Johnson. Continue reading

Commonwealth War Graves


Commonwealth War Graves

Some of you will have seen the Commonwealth War Graves Commission sign which has gone up outside St Sampson’s church. If you try to find the usual Portland stone headstones you will search in vain.

John Henry Rogers and Aaron Dennis are commemorated in the churchyard not with official war commission memorials but with personal gravestones.  There are no Commonwealth War Graves Commission memorials in St Sampson’s churchyard.

John Henry Dennis was Chief Stoker aboard HMS Earnest when he died on Tuesday 8th February 1916, age 39.

Aaron Rogers was a Petty Officer, on HMS Vivid, who died on Thursday February 10th, age 40.

For reasons unknown, neither of these men’s names appears on the war memorial in Golberdon.

Their graves can be found in the churchyard next to each other in the row of graves nearest to the road wall.

 

Thank You Miranda Lawrence-Owen for this information.

Percy Jenkin


The final resting place of Percy Jenkin

Percy’s parents, James and Mary Jenkin lived at Lower Downgate with their four daughters and five sons, most of whom who were born there and all baptised, either at home or Downgate Chapel, as Bible Christians. James was a miner although a few years later, he was recorded as being an invalid. That didn’t stop his eldest son George working in the mines too. Next in the family was Alfred who joined the Territorial Force. Then came Ephraim who joined the Royal Navy and was a stoker, first class, on HMS Vivid. Percy was next and he went to work for Mr. Lawry Rickard as a live-in waggonner at Manaton. The youngest brother Stanley got work at Trewassick for Mr. Nicholas Coad. He lived in, and looked after their cattle. Continue reading

Adventures in Portugal


Some of you might remember me

as Fiona Petto, from the days of the Scorpion Inn back in the 60s when my parents (John & Toinette) bought it and built on the Yew Tree dance hall but that is another story. Years past, I married Adrian (Adie) Wisher, had children and moved to Dorset where this story begins.

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Marathon Runner Cllr. Sharon Daw


>52 marathons in 46 weeks<

2017 got off to the worst start and 52 x 52! never entered my mind. And only doing two marathons in the first 4 months, along with the ensuing elections, both local and general, I had a lot to get on with. On top of delivering 10 yellow pages rounds and 5000 magazines to Plymouth surrounding area I was keeping busy albeit not running. Well 52 in 52! was a wild idea, not having any idea of what it meant and number 3 came on 6th May quite unintentionally. Really I’d entered the ox half but ran the ox 12 hour instead and felt awful leggy and tired and breathless. It was a struggle. I walked a lot and was so glad when completed. As I drove home I just couldn’t understand what was wrong. I’d been ill for 2 years with many trips to doctor and consultant, never actually proving very much other than ischemic heart disease, coming about during the heart break heartbreaker. Good run to have a mini stoke/ heart attack but the tracing looked awful and sent panic around the doctors the next day!

I felt awful, ran terrible and was coming to terms that 2016 would be the last year of running marathons and just had to deal with it the best I could. Loosing Marty on 4th January 2017 just added to my torment and headed deep down to the deepest darkest place I’ve ever been, and I’ve got to be honest I still wonder today how I’m actually still here to tell this story.

Dragging my body and weak mind around races was torment. I felt terrible in mind, body and soul and just didn’t know which way to go. I had highs but mostly lows and anyone with mental health knows how low you go and how hard it is to lift one’s spirit when there is so much negativity around. I hated my life, what I did and who I was. I just could not focus or think rationally and just wondered on. To my surprise, and still taking it in, I got elected on council, I don’t know why. Such a shock and with my mental state it took two weeks to sink in. Continue reading