Author Archives: AH

WW1 Exhibition at Sterts.


Linkinhorne History Group, exhibition to mark the centenary of the end of WW1 – and its effect on the Parish of Linkinhorne – is now up in the Gallery at Sterts. This exhibition includes illustration, information, artefacts and one of the newly restored Linkinhorne Rolls of Honour for WW1.  This exhibition is free and will remain at Sterts until the latter end of November.  The Gallery is open during Box Office hours.

 We will also be mounting another, quite separate, small exhibition to augment the centenary celebrations at Rilla Mill Village Hall where there will be a Victory Tea and Dance on Saturday November 10th – where the second of the restored Rolls of Honour will be officially handed back to Rilla Mill.

 Also, as part of our joint collaboration with Sterts, the Sterts Youth Theatre Group will enact a ‘walking play’, at sets around various locations on the Sterts campus, based on the research we have provided them with about the ‘100 men of Linkinhorne’ and the stories of their service in WW1. This will begin at 7.00pm on November 4th.

 And please don’t forget our talk on November 21st at the Cross Link Room, Upton Cross, where our guest speaker will be Major Hugo White who will further enlighten us with a talk entitled “The Role of the DCLI in WW1”.

 Peter Sharpe & Mike Todd.

LINKINHORNE History Group  EMAIL :  secretarylhg@btinternet.com

Church Matters Nov 2018


This is my 65th year, getting on a bit, but I was still born 9 years after the end of the Second World War. Whilst our nation has been involved in many conflicts during my lifetime, none of them have had a major impact on life in this country – although some terror attacks did come quite close while we were living in London. My mother told me a little of her recollections of the blitz – of one occasion when a stick of bombs was falling, each one getting closer, knowing that the next one would get her – but fortunately there wasn’t another one! My father never spoke about the war, other than to say that he was in a ‘reserved occupation’ and didn’t have to serve in the forces. It was only at his funeral that my brother and I learnt that he had been employed during the war years as an auditor hunting for ‘economic saboteurs’ – an account I shall now never be told in full.

Many, over the years, have been reticent to recount their war experiences, though fortunately a few have left us their stories in print, and there are many images which allow us a fuller picture. Today, of course, we see all too much of what is happening in conflicts around the world virtually as it happens. Such reporting shows us first hand what we have always really known – that war is a terrible thing in which there are no real winners, and where the only certainty is that there will be terrible suffering. This suffering is inflicted by all sides whether deliberately or by accident – wars create casualties – and wars are created by humanity. Continue reading

Stroke Befriending Service


Stroke Befriending Service

Have you had a stroke and would like to speak to someone who understands? Volunteer Cornwall’s Stroke Befriending Service could be just the thing you’re looking for.

One of our friendly Stroke Befriending volunteers can meet with you on a regular basis and offer support and encouragement. We have found this can really help to build confidence and make people feel less isolated and more connected to their community.

This is a completely free service and volunteers can visit people at home, in hospital or in a care home. Stroke Befriending is also available via telephone, email and video call.

Or if you have had a stroke and would like to help someone else in their recovery journey, why not get in touch and find out more about becoming a Stroke Befriending volunteer?

Contact Volunteer Cornwall to make a referral or find out more:

Email – Laura Smith, Stroke Befriending Co-ordinator, lauras@volunteercornwall.org.uk

Call – 01872 266997

Visit https://www.volunteercornwall.org.uk/how-we-help/health-social-care/stroke-befriending-service

Recycling for charity


Reduce waste going into landfill and support charities.

Please collect these items and recycle at a collection point near you, at the Parish Hall in Golberdob, Green Meadows (on the South Hill Road from Golberdon crossroads) ,  Callington Tesco, AONB centre at Drakewalls.

  • Baby food pouches & lids (any brand i.e. Ella’s kitchen) and Ella’s Kitchen snack wrappers
  • Plastic trigger tops and pumps from spray bottles
  • Plastic tops from washing up liquid bottles
  • Plastic air freshener packaging, cartridges and used air fresheners such as plug in refills (any brand – NO GLASS or aerosols)
  • Biscuit and crackers wrappers including individual wrappers like penguin and cake slices. Must be biscuit not confectionery
  • Used stamps (leave at least 1cm backing paper around stamp) both UK and Foreign
  • Mobile phones

Contact Ali  SHARE@south-hill.co.uk

SHARE = South Hill Association for Renewable Energy

 

Callington U3A


U3A News – At their September meeting Callington U3A were taken on a magical trip to the Galapagos Islands by Ian Casper, a retired teacher from Tavistock, who achieved a lifetime ambition visiting the archipelago. Through pictures he spoke of the differing landscapes, volcanic rock, forestation, plains, shorelines, emerald coves and mangrove lagoons. Ian showed examples of the endemic animals like the inquisitive sea lions who welcome visitors, the gentle endangered Marine Iguana the only lizard that swim and feed from the sea. Roaming the shoreline are the prehistoric looking Land Iguanas, the popular giant tortoise, remember Lonesome George, and the delightfully named crab Sally Lightfoot. He went on to explain the many species of birds, the red and blue footed boobies, the Great Frigate and flightless Cormorant that have developed skills to swim instead of fly. There are 14 species of finch. One Finch breed lives alongside the tortoise eradicating annoying insects from them. The tortoise support this toilette by raising their legs to help the procedure! Amazing flora and fauna grow on the equatorial islands.  Ferns and trees, a cactus that grows on lava and mangrove seeds that floated to the islands and grew into large vegetation lagoons. This brief tour of the Galapagos was extremely interesting thanks to Ian Casper. Maybe one day some of us can make the dream come true.

Next months U3A meeting is Monday Oct 1st 10:45am start at the TOWN HALL, Callington

and will be an illustrated talk about Kit Hill Country Park, it’s history, geology and more.

Kit hill is the highest point in the Tamar Valley and has 400 acres of heathland and is part of the Cornish Mining World Heritage site.

 

Church Matters


Church Matters

There are times when I’m intrigued by the lives of well-known personalities. So often they can be seen to be achieving so much in their lives, and yet at times there emerges the frailties that they can suffer in their more private moments. There can be no doubting the influence and success that they have, but we don’t often catch a glimpse of the inner person that may be quietly plagued with doubt and fear.

I recently came across a Guardian newspaper interview with Lisa Brennan-Jobs. I suspect that name will not be instantly recognisable, but Lisa is the daughter of Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple, the company that is now the largest in the world by market value (over 1 trillion dollars). He was in many senses a brilliant man – a visionary of how technology could be designed and produced to not only look and feel good, but effectively support new and effective ways of doing things. One well-known example was the launch of the iPhone back in 2007, a totally new approach to the mobile phone which changed the market completely. Since that time most mobile phone manufacturers try to out-do the latest iPhone with each release of a new product. Continue reading

Rame Trust


The Rame Conservation Trust

…… is a buildings preservation charity founded in 1997 which was established to preserve for the benefit of the people of the Rame Peninsula and of the nation at large, the historical, architectural and constructional heritage that exists in and around Maker Heights and the Rame Peninsula.

A Trust with the purpose of conserving and promoting the heritage assets and values at Maker Heights – the natural environmental value, the historical value the aesthetic and communal values.

The Trust owns the Grade 11* listed Barrack Block at Maker Heights, and leases from the Edgcumbe Estate a further 12 hectares which include the Scheduled Ancient Monuments redoubt 1, redoubt 3, redoubt 5 and Grenville Battery. Also the Nissen huts which house the Canteen cafe/restaurant and the camp site which the Trust manages.

The Maker Heights Conservation Management Plan is a collaborative project to explore opportunities for maximising public benefit and enjoyment of the site whilst conserving, enhancing and celebrating its heritage values and securing a sustainable future for the buildings, monuments and landscape.

The Trust has just secured its first Heritage at Risk Repair grant from Historic England. This is for a condition survey, schedule of works, overperspexing and repair of the worst windows in the Barrack Block

Although Maker was originally a military base (from the late 18th century), it is also well known as the school holiday camp established by Nancy Astor and the Virginia House Settlement in the 1920’s for ‘deprived city children’.

Apart from a brief spell during World War II when it was recommissioned as a military base, it continued as this until its closure in 1987. As a result, thousands of children (mainly from Plymouth) had their first and sometimes only childhood holiday at Maker.

More recently Maker has hosted hundreds of musicians who have played and learned their craft at the venue, thousands of festival-goers (with an annual music festival starting in 1999) and artists who had studios there. There’s also been a campsite and facilities for people to hold their wedding.

Regardless of whether they’re young or old, regular or occasional visitor, what’s become clear through the project is that everyone holds Maker dear to their hearts.

Maker Barracks View of front elevation

SAVE OUR CHURCH


CHERISHED & RESTORED OR LOCKED & LOST?

St Sampson’s Church, South Hill, as many of you will be aware, needs major repairs and improvements. In August our funding bid to the Heritage Lottery Fund was unsuccessful but they like our project and we were advised to reapply in the New Year under a new funding programme, with a scaled down project and more evidence of community need and support. There was one million pounds available to the South West with a total of five million being requested from fourteen applicants. We were asking for £500,000 so half the pot that was available!

Undeterred we will apply again. In consultation with our architect, the most urgent and essential items that need to be done are; the ceiling, which now has holes in it, the roof, which needs re–slating, the tower, to prevent water coming in, a toilet, which also means getting a water supply, and the window and stone work repairs, which will stop many of those pesky draughts. This scaled down work will still cost in excess of £300,000.

This is a huge sum, but not impossible to raise. Some people have said, “why doesn’t the Church of England pay for it?”  The answer is, “Each congregation is responsible for maintaining their church building and the Church of England does not provide money for repairs”. Others have said, “Taxes pay for churches”, the answer to that is, “no they don’t”. There is no central or official funding for church buildings. Another question may be, “we have a fantastic well used hall, why do we need another space?” and the answer is, “it is used almost to capacity and another public space will complement the hall”.   There are funding bodies out there that can help, but so can each member of our community. St Sampson’s needs to show not only why the repairs and improvements are needed but also that there is community support (the survey you all completed two years ago was a big help, thank you).  Funding bodies want to see the community rallying round, doing their best and doing their bit. The building with its rich heritage could be used much more by the community, especially if we have toilet facilities. Some of the things you suggested in the survey were concerts, exhibitions, a meeting space, educational classes. All this and more could happen if the repairs and improvements are done.  But… there is a real risk that without repairs, improvements and support St Sampson’s will be locked and lost in the future.

Does St Sampson’s hold a special place for you? Do you know about its Cornish heritage and history?

If you value St Sampson’s, for whatever reason, how can you help? Your time, your expertise, your ideas, your contacts, your enthusiasm. I have had a lot of conversations recently, making people aware of the situation, and this has resulted in some brilliant ideas and excitement for the project. We need to share ideas and enthusiasm and that is the purpose of the community meeting on Monday 29th October in the Parish Hall at 7.30pm. Please do come along, bring your friends and neighbours near and far, they don’t have to live in the parish.  We need you all for a group photo to show how valued St Sampson’s Church is.

Can’t make the meeting, but want to show support? contact Judith Ayers judithayers@yahoo.co.uk

 

Let’s make St Sampson’s Church Cherished and Restored.

Minefield


Minefield

How can a soldier deal with memories of war? What memories do they repress – and which do they cherish?

Three Argentine and three British veterans from both sides of the 1982 Falklands/Malvinas conflict came together for this remarkable show exploring the treacherous minefield of their memories, through theatre, film and live rock music.

MINEFIELD is an enthralling piece of documentary theatre by Argentinian actor and director Lola Arias – compassionate, cathartic and astonishingly moving. Performed to enormous acclaim in both Britain and Argentina and have taken the crew on tour to Paris, Frankfurt, Angers and Montpellier. The show takes you from the horrors of the battlefield to today’s uncertainties, with brutal honesty and startling humour. See more here

Cast: David Jackson, Lou Armour, Gabriel Sagastume, Ruben Otero, Sukrim Rai, Marcelo Vallejo

Dave Jackson lives in Trevigro, Congratulations on the success of Minefield and the wedding of your daughter in September. What an amazing time for you all.

Golliwogs


Golliwogs

The origins of the Golliwog begin with the British soldiers who occupied Egypt near the end of the 1800’s. Egyptian labourers working for the British bore the letters W.O.G.S. on their armbands, indicating that they were Working On Government Service. These labourers were spoken of as Ghuls- the Arabic word for desert ghosts – by the British troops. The children of the Egyptians played with black stuffed material dolls. These dolls in turn were given as gifts or purchased by the soldiers returning home to England. These dolls became known as Ghuliwogs, a name which become Golliwog

Florence Kate Upton, struck upon the character in 1895. Born into an eccentric English family who had recently emigrated to the United States, Florence found work as an illustrator and formulated the idea for a children’s book. Stuck for a main character, her aunt, found an old battered black-face rag doll in the attic. “ I called him ‘Golliwogg’” The Adventures Of Two Dutch Dolls And A Golliwogg, was soon published.

In this tale, the Golliwogg was initially described as ‘a horrid sight, the blackest gnome’, but turns out in fact to be good, loveable and brave, with a ‘kind face’.

He proved an instant hit with the British public, and Florence proceeded to publish a whole series of Golliwogg adventures.

They failed to trademark the Golliwogg character, and after the books had proved such a hit, toy companies jumped on the bandwagon. Slightly changing the name, they released a flurry of ‘Golliwog’ dolls, toys and badges.

Then, in 1910, John Robertson of jam manufacturing family saw children playing with a golliwog doll and decided it should be the company’s mascot. In the 1920s the company began producing Golliwog badges and enamel brooches which could be claimed by collecting tokens from jam jars. As more golliwog toys, watches and dinner sets were produced, the figure became part of everyday life and began to pop up in numerous children’s books.

It was in some of these stories, however, that they fell foul of the unpleasant racist stereotyping that has made the golliwog such a contentious figure in recent years. Children’s author Enid Blyton is seen as a major culprit, after portraying golliwogs in her Noddy stories as naughty thieves who once pinched Noddy’s prized yellow car.

Meanwhile, the word ‘wog’ began to be used as a derogatory word for black people. First popularised during World War II, it was uttered by some British soldiers as a slur against North Africans and other dark foreigners. By the 1960s, both the use of the term ‘golliwog’ and the dolls themselves were under increasing attack. Seen at best as racially insensitive and at worst as racist and vicious, golliwogs were gradually removed from public life. In 1983, the Greater London Council banned Robertson’s products from its jurisdiction, and in 1988 the character was no longer used in TV advertising.

Who still has their badges and models ?????