Author Archives: AH

Church meeting Nov 26th


St Sampson’s Unlocked. Cherished, Restored, Unlocked, Church

St Sampson’s Community meeting Monday 26th November 2018

A great turnout with a packed hall and apologies from another 30 people who couldn’t be there. There were representatives from; The Parish Council, SHARE, WI, Horticultural Society, St Sampson’s PCC, Golberdon girls’ choir, Hall committee, Zumba group, playgroup and from neighbouring local churches. Many thanks to Rev Annabel King who started the meeting and Simon Crosbie from the architect team and Peter Tulloch our photographer. It was a very productive evening, with lots of support shown for the project.

The meeting began with a rousing rendition of the Cornish anthem “Trelawney” and we enjoyed seeing the amazing painting of Lady Trelawney which was kindly lent to us for the evening and the image of Bishop Trelawney given with kind permission from Truro museum. The importance of these esteemed figures being that South Hill was Bishop Trelawney’s first parish when he became a parish priest. Our fabulous quilt depicting St Sampson, made by the South Hill Piece makers group was also displayed along with a wonderful banner created by the local toddler group JAMM.

The importance of community support was stressed, not just in terms of fundraising but in the community demonstrating that they wanted the St Sampson Unlocked project to go ahead.   Continue reading

The Few that fed The Many


2018 – 100 years since the end of the First World War

In 2014, the NFU marked the centenary of the start of the First World War by commissioning a report – The Few That Fed The Many – which investigated the impact that the Great War had on British farming families, read it here.

By the outbreak of the First World War on 4 August 1914, Britain was 60 percent reliant on imports for food supplies and other commodities such as fuel and fertilisers, there was only enough wheat to last for 125 days. Government was importing around 78 per cent of wheat and flour along with 40 percent of meat, this should have prompted a change in attitude towards food security as Britain was not in a position to be able to feed itself.

German U-Boats cut off trade routes, and the government turned to our farmers to feed the nation during this time of crisis.

Almost a third of male farm workers had gone to war, more than 170,000 farmers fought in the trenches along with mechanics and blacksmiths, half a million farm horses had been requisitioned by the War Office to help at the front line. Machinery was limited and experts scarce to maintain and fix, plus fertilisers and feed were in short supply. Continue reading

Welcome Caroline


My name is Caroline, I’ve recently moved to Golberdon with my dog Eliza.  I’ve achieved a dream by buying some land in Latchley, much neglected for many years, my priority is to improve the ground. I’ve worked with goats, and intend to get some Angoras in the near future, but for now I’ve decided one of the ways to begin land recovery, was to get some sheep to graze! I’ve worked with sheep before, and when I started to look into breeds, I just fell in love with the fleeces of UK rare breeds, and settled on a small flock of pedigree Teeswater sheep and I’m now venturing into wool production.

I intend to sell my wool fibre for carding, spinning, felting, and any other crafting hobbies, either as raw locks or hand washed and dyed. Continue reading

Duchy College news


News from The Duchy College Stoke Climsland

MSc Student Has Research Published In Horse & Hound Magazine

Owners may well be rugging their horses when it is not necessary – and may be compromising their welfare as a result, a study has shown. Although it has become routine for many horses to be rugged all year, there have been few studies on rugging, and none on the effects of different rugs on horses’ body temperature. Continue reading

Roll of Honour


Roll of Honour Servicemen from South Hill Parish who died in the two world wars 1914-18 and 1939-45

Private John Garfield Doney Aged 21 The London Regiment. Son of William & Martha Doney, Wagmuggle.

Private Thomas Drew Aged 29 The Somerset Light Infantry Son of Mr and Mrs William Drew from Pensilva

Private Percy Jenkin Aged 22 The Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry. Before enlisting, he lived at Manaton where he worked as a waggonner.

Private William Gordon Landry Aged 24 The Essex Regiment Son of William & Elizabeth Landry, Trevigro.

2nd Lieutenant Herbert Gloyne Forster-Morris Aged 19 The South Wales Borderers Only son of the Reverend Herbert and Mrs Forster-Morris, the Rector of South Hill.

Private William Nicholas Stephens Aged 28 The Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry Son of Stephen and Harriet Stephens, of Pear Tree Row, Callington.

Sapper Vernon William Buckingham Aged 21 The Royal Engineers Uncle of Jill Reynolds & Shirley Shears.

Also remembered from this parish, but not named on the war memorial

Able Seaman Stanley Jenkin, brother of Percy Aged 18 Lived at Trewassick where he looked after the cattle. Read more here.

John Henry Dennis Chief Stoker aboard HMS Earnest died aged 39

and

Aaron Rogers Petty Officer on HMS Vivid died aged 40, both are buried in South Hill churchyard. Their graves can be found next to each other in the row of graves nearest to the road wall.

Callington U3A November meeting


We celebrated the Armistice with a morning or nostalgia from music, singing, poems, a play, memorabilia and baking.

On arriving at the Town hall we were welcomed with a crocheted poppy beautifully made by our Secretary Jo. The stage was decorated with red, white and blue bunting and red balloons. Silhouettes of soldiers were displayed along with a beautiful flower arrangement by Eileen Sturt,each of the yellow roses representing one of the named men on the Memorial. Whilst enjoying a cup of tea or coffee we were able to sample a selection of cakes, biscuits and bread, each made following war time recipes by our baking group. These included Anzac biscuits, Trench cake, potato scones, oatmeal and ginger biscuits, potato and chocolate biscuits and bread and dripping. Continue reading

Church Matters December 2018


The Christmas season is upon us. Have you ever heard people say that Christmas is really for the children? I think the implication is that as we get older the fascination and excitement about Christmas somewhat dies down – we tend not to view it in the same way that we once did. When I look back over my own life I can remember the excitement that I had as a child, the sense of having a good time with friends as a teenager, and then regaining some of the excitement and wonder when having children of my own. In these later years it’s been more about spending time with a grown up family amidst all the church activities – quite a rich combination really.

But what about that thought – Christmas is really for the children. If you’ve ever been around a church at Christmas over the past ten years or so, you’re likely to have come across something called a “Christingle Service”. This is a special event that celebrates the work of The Children’s Society – a charity with Christian roots that works amongst some of the most disadvantaged youngsters and families across the nation. The charity was founded in 1881 by Edward Rudolf, a Sunday school teacher, and it has had a close connection with the Church and the Christian faith throughout its existence.

The work of the charity is quite varied, from activities aimed at ending child poverty, to helping young people access mental health support, and help for those youngsters who have gone missing from their homes. They also engage in activities towards the prevention of child sexual exploitation, alongside support for young carers (those providing support for parents who have ill-health). The charity also takes on political issues where they feel there are voices that aren’t being heard. Continue reading

And Some Came Home


Callington Town Band, in association with Callington Community College and the People of Callington & District, presented AND SOME CAME HOME.

 

Conceived and written by Shirley Morse and originally staged in 2014, this production has been made possible by a grant from Tesco “Bags of Help” scheme.

The First World War claimed the lives of William John Smith the Town Band’s principal cornet player, who was born and lived at St. Mellion. He joined the 1st Btn. Kings Royal Rifle Corps and was 19 when killed in action on the Western  Front on 14th Sept. 1914, just a few weeks after the war had begun. Also Robert Hicks Pike, born in Callington in 1878, he ran his late father’s drapers shop in Fore St. before he was conscripted during 1916 into 2nd Btn. Grenadier Guards. He died in action on 6th July 1917 aged 39. Continue reading